Yumedono (Hall of Visions)

National treasure
Nara Period: beginning of 8th - end of 8th c.

Kuse Kannon (Avalokitesvara the Savior)

National treasure
Asuka Period: mid 6th - beginning of 8th c.

The monk Gyōshin Sōzu constructed in 739 a temple called the Jōgūōin, or Jōgūō-Temple—Jōgūō being another name for Prince Shōtoku—as a monument to the memory of the prince. He built this temple, the current Eastern Precinct, on the site where the Ikaruga Palace, which was built in 601, originally stood. The heart of the precinct is the Hall of Visions. Within this octagonal pavilion—the oldest of its kind in Japan-is enshrined the Kuse Kannon, or Avalokitesvara the Savior (Asuka Period), a life-size statue of Prince Shōtoku. Piously kept in its shrine throughout the centuries, this Hidden Statue has survived in a perfect state of preservation to this day. Retaining even its original gilding. Around the statue stand various others, including the Heian-period ShōKannon Bosatsu, or Sacred Avalokitesvara; a Kamakura-period statue depicting the filial piety of Prince Shōtoku; a Nara-period dry-lacquer statue of Gyōshin Sōzu, the monk who built the East Precinct, and a Heian-period clay image of Dōsen Risshi, the monk who supervised the repair of the Hall of Visions during the Heian Period. The Hall of Visions is enclosed by a cloister-gallery and the Kamakura-period Hall of Worship (Raidō), which was originally the Central Gate (Chūmon) of the Eastern Precinct. Many people say that the Hall of Visions-a sanctuary erected to pray for the repose of the soul of Prince Shōtoku, who is said to have been a manifestation of the Kuse Kannon-is enveloped in a peculiar, mystical atmosphere.

Shariden (Reliquary Hall) and Eden (Hall of Painting

Important cultural property
Kamakura Period: late 12th - early 14th c.

The Reliquary Hall houses the relics of a Buddha. which legend has sprang forth from the palms of two-year-old Prince Shōtoku as he joined his hands in prayer. The Hall of Paintings houses painted shoji, or sliding paper-doors, that depict the entire life of Prince Shōtoku.

Denpōdō (Hall of Buddhist Teachings)

National treasure
Nara Period: beginning of 8th - end of 8th c.

The Hall of Buddhist Teachings was originally the private residence of Tachibana no Konakach, wife of Emperor Shōmu, and was brought to the temple and converted Into a Buddhist hall. This unusual event has bequeathed to researchers today an invaluable piece of ancient Japanese residential architecture. The structure houses various Buddhist statues, including three sets of Nara-period dry-lacquer Amida triads on a long altar.

Tōin Shōrō (Bell House of the Eastern Precinct)

National treasure
Kamakura Period: late 12th - early 14th c.

The Bell House of the Eastern Precinct is constructed in a trapezoidal form known as hakamagoshi (spreading skirt). Within it hangs a Nara-period bell that has the words "Chūgūji" (Chūgū Temple) engraved on the inside, indicating that it has been in the possession of at least one other temple over its more than 1,000-year existence Note: Architectural structures built during either the Asuka or Hakuhō periods are considered as Asuka-period architecture in this brochure.

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